08/14/12
How Google Knowledge Graph Can Inspire Content Creation

By now, many of us will be aware of an additional panel of information on the right-hand side of Google’s search engine results pages (SERPs). If you haven’t seen this, then search for ‘Nottingham Castle’ and you’ll see what we mean.Google Knowledge Graph

This is the product of Google’s first foray into so called ‘semantic search’ - Google Knowledge Graph – which has now reached the UK, providing what it hopes will be a string of related information that will answer search queries more exactly in terms of the users’ intended context. In terms of search engine optimisation (SEO), the jury is still out as to how this might affect website rankings, but what is clear is that it could irreversibly change the behaviour of Internet users as more information is found directly from Google’s SERPs. We shall wait and see.

Learn from Google

What can be learnt from this experiment is that Google believes Internet users increasingly want access to information quickly that is both relevant, accurate and within context. If we are to trust Google’s judgement here (and there’s no reason why we shouldn’t – given their success with search), then it just goes to show how important it is to generate unique content and copy for your website, blog and social channels that is equally accurate and relevant for your customers.

Here are 3 key areas in which you can improve your content creation:

1.     Use Google to find direct sources

When writing blogs, articles or longer pieces, make sure that you reference the facts. This can be done by citing the original source of the information, or simply by linking to where the information came from. Passing other people’s work off as your own might earn you temporary respect, but once you’re found out – well, you should know what is likely to happen.

Referencing and citing sources actually has the opposite effect – it generates trust and shows the reader that you’ve spent time to research your work properly. Trust and confidence is what you’re after – so that your readers or customers keep coming back to you time after time again.

The following resources are great for finding source information:

  • Google Books – Search and read books and magazines, many of which are shown in their entirety.
  • Google Scholar – Search for links to scholarly papers on every subject under the sun.

2.     Use specialised search engines and online encyclopaedias

Some search engines already specialise in trying to answer questions. The most well-known is the Wulfram Alpha – the computational knowledge engine which has a free and subscription version (the latter providing additional interactivity and visual depiction of results). Wulfram Alpha

This search engine is excellent for collating statistics for use in content creation. It provides citations to the original sources from where information is collated, which means that you can explore further and find additional detail and information for your content too.

Here’s a search we did by simply typing in London versus Nottingham – this provided us with a comparison of various statistics between the two cities, including population and flight times, for example.

You could also pay to use an encyclopaedia such as the now completely online Encyclopaedia Britannica – a well-known and trusted resource. The cost runs at about £7.60 per month – not bad for access to a reliable source of detailed information. There is also of course the free Wikipedia (which has improved greatly in terms of accuracy over the last few years) and its many sister websites, all specialising in various areas of information and data – for the full list, visit the Wikimedia Foundation website.

3.     Social media and social search

One obvious way to get information and answers is by sharing your questions and research ideas online using social channels. Quora is an excellent example through which professionals and experts pose and answer questions on a huge range of subjects across various industries. Social media and networks are also an excellent way to find out about the latest trends and conversations that could spark you to debate and comment on current issues.

Topsy How Google Knowledge Graph Can Inspire Content CreationThere are various social search engines, such as Topsy or Social Mention that will search across channels for specific queries giving links to the source of a conversation.

If you’re looking for collaborators or experts on a specific subject to help you or contribute to your content creation ideas, then Followerwonk is a great way to search and filter through Twitter users’ biographies.

Further advice

For further advice about SEO and content creation, please feel free to contact Landingnet with your query.